There are practical measures that can be taken to encourage wildlife biodiversity. Some of the strategies we have used are mentioned below. This list is not by any means exhaustive but we think we have identified some important ones.

  • We have discussed elsewhere on this website the strategic use of livestock to minimise fire risk. This is not possible or advisable on some properties. It depends on context.

  • Firebreaks are part of minimising fire risk. We have a firebreak on one section of our property. Instead of clearing any existing vegetation we incorporated a cleared paddock.

  • We keep areas around buildings clear to provide some protection from wildfire. In our pastures we tend to keep them clear of debris as it is a lot easier to slash. However, in areas around natural vegetation and waterways we allow the debris such as leaf litter, fallen logs, branches, tree stumps, rocks and leaf litter to accumulate on the ground. Old logs (particularly hollow ones) can be placed on the ground to increase habitat. It can look messy and it can be tempting to clean it up. However, this debris provides a greater diversity of habitat for wildlife.

  • We leave snags, submerged logs, branches and litter in our creek, which runs usually year round. Logs, snags, and litter provide habitat for frogs, fish and insects. Logs that are half submerged offer perching opportunities for birds and turtles.

  • We are planning to plant a strip of at least 20 meters wide along our creek bank. This will provide shelter and habitat for wildlife and help in stabilising the banks.

  • We have planted native vegetation around our dam, but not on the dam wall. We have also left the front of the dam clear  of high vegetation to allow unobstructed flight paths for birds to access the water.

  • Our livestock do not have access to our dams and creek as they are fenced off because manure and urine can elevate nutrient levels, reducing water quality. Our livestock have troughs that they use for water.

  • We made our dam more wildlife friendly with gently sloping banks, a large surface area and different depths. This is helpful in increasing biodiversity. Rocks and logs in and around our dam provides homes for wildlife.

  • We have planted hundreds of native plant species to provide a range of ecosystem services including controlling erosion, windbreaks, corridors to help increase connectivity between fragments of habitat, sequester carbon, improve water infiltration and improve water quality. AND, don't forget the understory. Find out more here.

  • In fencing off these areas, we have used wildlife friendly fencing to minimise native fauna becoming entangled in barbed wire fences. We have used plain wire on the top and bottom strands.

  • Old trees provide important habitat through various means including providing nesting hollows for possums, gliders, owls, parrots, wood ducks etc. Unfortunately, we had none of these on our property and have had to provide some nesting boxes. For more information on the importance of old trees please click here. We have also discussed elsewhere on this website the importance of old trees as part of tree communities.

  • We have planted a woodlot of various eucalyptus species for timber and firewood to avoid the need to harvest fallen timber and standing dead trees, which are important wildlife habitat.

  • We have spent and will continue to spend a fair amount of time on weed control. We have been strategic in our approach – sort of like triage where certain weed species are prioritised due to their problematic environmental impacts. We tend to remove some weeds as soon as they appear on our property (e.g. Giant Devils Fig) and we also remove some weeds or their flowers before they set seed (e.g. Fireweed).

  • Weeds in certain contexts provide important habitat for native species. This is particularly the case on our property which had little native vegetation left. For example, we have left the lantana in the section of our property where natural regeneration is occurring. This weed is providing both protection and nesting sites for various small birds such as wrens and finches.

  • We do use herbicides but very selectively. When we arrived there was about three acres of Singapore Daisy, which alarmingly was spreading towards the creek. The only way we could get rid of it was to spray. We have a very healthy frog population and so we do not usually spray anywhere near the dam or boggy areas.

  • We have two dogs who are strictly controlled in relation to their movements. They are kept away from wildlife because uncontrolled dogs (and cats for that matter) can severely impact local wildlife. Our dogs are kept in at night. We do not have cats and never intend to, but if we did, they would not be allowed outside.

  • We have discussed elsewhere on this website the strategic use of livestock to minimise fire risk. This is not possible or advisable on some properties. It depends on context.

  • Firebreaks are part of minimising fire risk. We have a firebreak on one section of our property. Instead of clearing any existing vegetation we incorporated a cleared paddock.

  • We keep areas around buildings clear to provide some protection from wildfire. In our pastures we tend to keep them clear of debris as it is a lot easier to slash. However, in areas around natural vegetation and waterways we allow the debris such as leaf litter, fallen logs, branches, tree stumps, rocks and leaf litter to accumulate on the ground. Old logs (particularly hollow ones) can be placed on the ground to increase habitat. It can look messy and it can be tempting to clean it up. However, this debris provides a greater diversity of habitat for wildlife.

  • We leave snags, submerged logs, branches and litter in our creek, which runs usually year round. Logs, snags, and litter provide habitat for frogs, fish and insects. Logs that are half submerged offer perching opportunities for birds and turtles.

  • We are planning to plant a strip of at least 20 meters wide along our creek bank. This will provide shelter and habitat for wildlife and help in stabilising the banks.

  • We have planted native vegetation around our dam, but not on the dam wall. We have also left the front of the dam clear  of high vegetation to allow unobstructed flight paths for birds to access the water.

  • Our livestock do not have access to our dams and creek as they are fenced off because manure and urine can elevate nutrient levels, reducing water quality. Our livestock have troughs that they use for water.

  • We made our dam more wildlife friendly with gently sloping banks, a large surface area and different depths. This is helpful in increasing biodiversity. Rocks and logs in and around our dam provides homes for wildlife.

  • We have planted hundreds of native plant species to provide a range of ecosystem services including controlling erosion, windbreaks, corridors to help increase connectivity between fragments of habitat, sequester carbon, improve water infiltration and improve water quality.

  • In fencing off these areas, we have used wildlife friendly fencing to minimise native fauna becoming entangled in barbed wire fences. We have used plain wire on the top and bottom strands.

  • Old trees provide important habitat through various means including providing nesting hollows for possums, gliders, owls, parrots, wood ducks etc. Unfortunately, we had none of these on our property and have had to provide some nesting boxes.

  • We have planted a woodlot of various eucalyptus species for timber and firewood to avoid the need to harvest fallen timber and standing dead trees, which are important wildlife habitat.

  • We have spent and will continue to spend a fair amount of time on weed control. We have been strategic in our approach – sort of like triage where certain weed species are prioritised due to their problematic environmental impacts. We tend to remove some weeds as soon as they appear on our property (e.g. Giant Devils Fig) and we also remove some weeds or their flowers before they set seed (e.g. Fireweed).

  • Weeds in certain contexts provide important habitat for native species. This is particularly the case on our property which had little native vegetation left. For example, we have left the lantana in the section of our property where natural regeneration is occurring. This weed is providing both protection and nesting sites for various small birds such as wrens and finches.

  • We do use herbicides but very selectively. When we arrived there was about three acres of Singapore Daisy, which alarmingly was spreading towards the creek. The only way we could get rid of it was to spray. We have a very healthy frog population and so we do not usually spray anywhere near the dam or boggy areas.

  • We have two dogs who are strictly controlled in relation to their movements. They are kept away from wildlife because uncontrolled dogs (and cats for that matter) can severely impact local wildlife. Our dogs are kept in at night. We do not have cats and never intend to, but if we did, they would not be allowed outside.

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